Using Windows Media Player

Windows Media Player has been a part of Microsoft Windows for nearly two decades . Through the years, Microsoft has steadily improved its capabilities, polished its design, and tightened its links to other parts of Windows . All editions of Windows 7 include Windows Media Player 12 .

You can use Windows Media Player to play sound and video files stored on a local disk (including removable media such as flash drives, CDs, and DVDs), or stream the output across a network (or over an internet connection) to and from other computers, servers, or devices . You can rip tracks from audio CDs (that is, copy them to your hard disk) in a broad range of quality levels, create custom CDs using a CD or DVD drive that has recording capabilities, and download songs to a portable audio player, as long as it isn't an iPod or a Zune. You can use the player as a jukebox to listen to all of your favorite songs, in custom sequences that you devise (called playlists) or in random order. If you have a DVD drive, you can use the Player to screen your favorite movies and concert videos on a desktop or portable PC

Windows Media Player also serves as the engine for other media-related features in Windows 7 . For example, when you use Windows Media Center to play music, view pictures, or watch a video, Windows Media Player is actually doing the work in the background.

The arrangement of the basic building blocks in Windows Media Player hasn't changed much over the past decade, although its visual design is greatly streamlined and much more sophisticated in Windows 7 . For the most part, you'll switch between two primary views of Windows Media Player. The Player Library view, shown in Figure 12-2, is used to browse, search, and arrange your media library. It consists of five main elements, some of which might be hidden

-Navigation pane

Details pane-

List pane-

-Navigation pane

Details pane-

List pane-

Playback controls-

Figure 12-2 Five basic elements of the Windows Media Player interface.

Playback controls-

Figure 12-2 Five basic elements of the Windows Media Player interface.

• Address bar Contains a breadcrumb trail that helps you find your current place in the library. The Back and Forward buttons at the left of the Player taskbar work just as they do in Internet Explorer. Below the address bar is a toolbar whose contents change depending on the current selection. At the right of the toolbar is a search box

• Navigation pane This customizable, resizable pane serves the same basic function as its counterpart in Windows Explorer. You can choose any major node in the media library, select removable media such as CDs and DVDs, work with portable devices, and view any libraries that are available over the network

• Details pane The contents of this pane change, depending on the type of content you've selected from the library and which view is applied. In Windows Media Player 12, the Now Playing option is no longer available for this pane.

• List pane This resizable pane displays the contents of the current playlist when the Play tab is selected. The Burn and Sync tabs allow you to create or edit a list of tracks to be burned to a CD (or DVD) or transferred to a compatible portable device, respectively. An info box above the list shows album art for the current track. Click any tab to show or hide its associated list.

• Playback controls Manage playback of audio and video files, using DVD-style controls to play, pause, fast-forward, and rewind files; this area also includes a variety of special-purpose buttons that control volume and the appearance of the Player. If a file is playing, details appear to the left of the controls . The button to the right of the playback controls allows you to quickly switch from Library view to Now Playing view.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Digital Cancers

Digital Cancers

Get All The Support And Guidance You Need To Be A Success At Protecting Your PC. This Book Is One Of The Most Valuable Resources In The World When It Comes To The Damaging Facts About Computer Viruses.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment