Searching Your Computer Search Options

Search options control the way the Windows Search service searches your computer. By default, Windows Search searches indexed locations and nonindexed locations in different ways:

• In indexed locations, the Windows Search service searches filenames and contents. This means that it will look for matches to your search text in filenames and folder names, file properties and folder properties, and the actual textual contents of files.

• In nonindexed locations, the Windows Search service searches filenames only. This means it will look for matches to your search text only in filenames and folder names. It will not look for matches to your search text in file and folder properties, or in the actual textual contents of files.

By default, Windows Search searches subfolders of a selected location and allows partial matches. Thanks to partial matching, the Windows Search service matches your search text to part of a word or phrase rather than to whole words only. This allows you to search for picture and get matching results for pictures, pictured, my picture, my pictures, and so on.

You can customize the search options for your computer by completing the following steps:

1. In Windows Explorer, click Organize on the menu bar and then click "Folder and search options." Finally, select the Search tab in the Folder Options dialog box.

2. As shown in Figure 6-23, you can then use the Search tab options in the Folder Options dialog box to configure search options. To restore the default search options, discussed previously, click Restore Defaults, click OK, and then skip the remaining steps.

Folder Option;

General View Search

What to search

In indexed locations, search file names and contents, n non-Indexed locations, search tile names only. Always search file names and contents (this might take several minutes)

How to search

Include subfolders in search results when searching in file folders J Find partial matches

Use natural language search |r| Don't use the index when searching In file folders for system files Isearches might take longerl

When searching non-Indexed locations 171 Include system directories nclude compressed files ZIP LZEZj

| Restore Defaults |

OK Cancel ] Apply

Figure 6-23. Configuring the search options

3. On the "What to search" panel, select the options that best describe what you want to be searched. To have the Windows Search service always search filenames and contents, select "Always search file names and contents." To have the Windows Search service search contents only for indexed locations, select "In indexed locations."

If you select the "Always search" option, you force the Windows Search service to ignore whether a folder is indexed when searching. This does not mean that indexes won't be used, however. When indexes are available, the Windows Search service will use them. When indexes aren't available, the Windows Search service will not be able to use indexes to speed up the search process, and this can result in extremely slow searches.

4. On the "How to search" panel, use the following options to configure how searches work:

Include subfolders in search results

When selected, the Windows Search service searches the selected location and all subfolders underneath it. This lets you search entire drives or complete folder structures. When not selected, the Windows Search service searches only the selected location and does not search their subfolders.

Find partial matches

When selected, the Windows Search service returns results for partial matches as well as whole-word matches. When not selected, the Windows Search service performs whole-word searches only.

Use natural language search

When selected, the Windows Search service allows you to enter search text as a question you might ask someone else. For example, you could enter the question, "Where is the Music folder?" and the Windows Search service would know that you are looking for a folder named Music or folders containing music. When not selected, the Windows Search service uses all the text you enter for matching, as discussed previously.

Don't use the index when searching in file folders for system files

When selected, the Windows Search service ignores indexes when searching in file folders for system files. This forces the Windows Search service to examine the current state of system files, but it can be extremely slow. When not selected, the Windows Search service uses indexes to speed up the search process if indexes are available. Normally, system files are not indexed as they aren't searched very often by most users and for this reason you'll want to bypass the index when you are searching for system files. However, if you are an advanced user or administrator and have indexed system files, you'll want to use the index when searching (in most cases).

5. On the "When searching non-indexed locations" panel, specify whether the Windows Search service includes system locations, compressed files, or both when searching nonindexed locations.

6. Click OK to save your search options.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment