Recovering Using Restore Points

You use restore points to fix problems and undo changes to the operating system, programs, and devices. When selecting a restore point, keep in mind that any programs that were added to your computer since the restore point was made will be deleted and any programs that were removed since the restore point was made will be restored.

If the restore point doesn't resolve your problem, you can undo it (in most cases) or choose another restore point. However, if you started the computer in Safe Mode or are using the Recovery Environment, the System Restore cannot be undone.

If you cannot start your computer, you can try to access System Restore in the Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE). For more information, see "Repairing a Computer to Enable Startup" on page 840, later in this chapter.

Although using a restore point does not affect personal data, user accounts and passwords on the computer can be affected. If you or any other user on your computer changed passwords recently, you may want to create a Password Reset disk before trying to restore the computer.

If you can start your computer and log on, you can try to recover the computer using a restore point by following these steps:

1. Click StartsControl PanelsSystem and Security.

2. Click the "Restore your computer to an earlier time" link under the Action Center heading.

3. Click Open System Restore. This starts the System Restore Wizard. Click Next.

4. System Restore recommends one or more recent restore points, as shown in Figure 21-14. Restore points are listed by date, time, description, and type. To get more information and access additional options, do the following:

• To see additional restore points that are available, click Show More Restore Points.

• To determine what programs the restore will affect, click the restore point and then click Scan For Affected Programs.

> I Typically, it will take System Restore several minutes to scan the restore I point and determine the affected programs. You'll then see two separate fly lists. The first list shows you programs and drivers that will be deleted if you apply the restore point. The second list shows you programs and drivers that might be restored if you apply the restore point.

5. Click the restore point you want to use. Restore points you've created have the type Manual. Restore points created by Windows 7 have the type System.

6. Click Next and then click Finish. When prompted, click Yes to confirm that you want to restore the computer's system files and settings using the selected restore point. Do not interrupt the restore process once it has started.

Figure 21-14. Choosing a restore point

7. System Restore will then prepare to restore your computer. During the restoration, System Restore restarts your computer. During startup, System Restore uses the settings from restore points you've selected.

8. After your computer restarts and you log in, a System Restore dialog box is displayed. Read the message provided and then click Close.

If Windows 7 isn't working properly after the restore operation, you can apply a different restore point or try to reverse the restore operation by following these steps:

1. Click Starts-Control Panels-System and Security.

2. Click the "Restore your computer to an earlier time" link under the Action Center heading.

3. Click Open System Restore. On the "Restore system files and settings" page, shown in Figure 21-15, do one of the following:

• Select "Undo System Restore," click Next and then follow the prompts to recover the system to its previous state.

• Select "Choose a different restore point," click Next and then follow the prompts to select a different restore point.

Figure 21-15. Undoing a restore point

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment