Updating the Deployment Share

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The Windows AIK 2 . 0 comes with Windows PE 3 .0, so no additional files are necessary to create Windows PE boot images for MDT 2010. When you update your deployment share in the Deployment Workbench, MDT 2010 automatically generates the following custom Windows PE images (here platform is x86 or x64):

■ Lite Touch Windows PE (platform) .wim file

■ LiteTouchPE_platform. iso

If you want, you can configure the deployment share to also generate the following Windows PE images:

■ Generic Windows PE (platform)

■ Generic_platform. iso

You don't need to manually customize Windows PE to add network interface card (NIC) device drivers to it. Deployment Workbench automatically adds the NIC device drivers that you add to the deployment share to the Windows PE boot images . You have the additional option of automatically adding video and system device drivers from the deployment share to the Windows PE boot images . You can also perform additional customizations of your Windows PE images . For example, you can customize the background bitmap, add additional directories, and increase the scratch space size from its default value of 32 megabytes (MB) up to a maximum of 512 MB if needed. To learn more about customizing Windows PE, see the Windows Preinstallation Environment User's Guide for Windows 7 in the Windows AIK .

Updating a deployment share causes Deployment Workbench to update its configuration files, source files, and Windows PE images . Deployment Workbench updates the deployment share's files and generates the Windows PE boot images when you update the deployment share, not when you create it. Deployment Workbench stores these boot images in the deployment share's \Boot folder. After you have updated the deployment share and generated Windows PE images, you can add the .wim image file to Windows Deployment Services . If you want, you can burn the Windows PE .iso images to CD or DVD media by using third-party CD/ DVD-burning software. Windows Deployment Services is the best way to start the Windows PE boot images on lab computers . Updating the boot images is faster than burning media, and booting destination computers is quicker. For more information, see Chapter 10.

NOTE You must use the same platform edition of Windows PE to start computers for installing each platform edition of Windows. In other words, you must start destination computers using a x86 edition of Windows PE to install a x86 edition of Windows 7. Likewise, you must use a x64 edition of Windows PE to install a x64 edition of Windows 7. If you use mismatched editions, you might see errors indicating that the image is for a different type of computer. Deployment Workbench automatically chooses the correct platform edition of Windows PE to match the operating system you're deploying.

To configure a deployment share for imaging in the lab, perform the following steps:

1. In the Deployment Workbench console tree, click Deployment Shares .

2. In the details pane, right-click the deployment share you want to configure and then click Properties.

3. Click the General tab and then choose the platforms that the deployment share supports . To indicate that the deployment share supports the x86 platform, select the x86 check box. To indicate that the deployment share supports the x64 platform, select the x64 check box . This option determines the platforms for which Deployment Workbench generates Windows PE boot images .

4. Click the Rules tab and then edit the deployment share's settings . These settings are located in CustomSettings.ini, which is located in the deployment share's Control folder. For more information about the settings that you can configure on this tab, see the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Reference in MDT 2010 .

5. Click the Windows PE Settings (platform) tab for each platform and edit the settings described in Table 6-6, as shown on the following page. Then, click OK .

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table 6-6 Windows PE Settings Tab AREA SETTINGS

Images to Generate A Lite Touch Windows PE WIM file Select this

Generate option to generate a customized WIM file that you can use to perform LTI using Windows Deployment Services (this option is selected by default and cannot be cleared).

generate A lite Touch Bootable ISO Image Select this option to generate a bootable customized Windows PE ISO image that you can use to perform LTI by starting your destination computers manually (this option is selected by default), generate A generic Windows PE WIM file Select this option to generate a generic WIM file that you can use to perform LTI using Windows Deployment Services .

generate A generic Bootable ISO Image Select this option to generate a bootable generic Windows PE ISO image that you can use to perform LTI by starting your destination computers manually

Windows PE Custom Background Bitmap File Type the path and file name Customizations of a bitmap file to use as the Windows PE background.

Extra Directory To Add Type the path of a folder containing extra files and subfolders to add to the Windows PE bootable images . Scratch Space Size Select the size of the scratch space for your Windows PE image . The available values are 32, 64, 128, 256, and 512 MB, with 32 being the default.

6. Click the Windows PE Components (platform) tab for each platform and edit the settings described in Table 6-7, as shown here, and then click OK .

table 6-7 Windows PE Components Tab AREA SETTINGS

Feature Packs ADO Select this option to add the Microsoft ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) optional feature to the Windows PE bootable images

Optional Fonts Select the font support to add to the Windows PE boot images that Deployment Workbench generates . You must add these fonts when performing an LTI deployment of Windows Vista images when the setup files are Japanese, Korean, or Chinese. The Optional Fonts area provides the following options:

Adding additional fonts to Windows PE boot images increases the size of the images . Add additional fonts only if necessary.

Driver Injection Selection Profile Use this list box to choose one of the following selection profiles to include the appropriate device drivers in your Windows PE images:

■ Everything Includes all folders from all nodes in Deployment Workbench This selection profile includes all applications, operating systems, device drivers, operating system packages, and task sequences .

■ All Drivers Includes all folders from the Out-Of-Box Drivers node in Deployment Workbench This selection profile includes all device drivers

■ All Drivers And Packages Includes all folders from the Applications and Out-Of-Box Drivers nodes in Deployment Workbench This selection profile includes all applications and device drivers

■ Nothing Includes no folders in Deployment Workbench This selection profile includes no items

■ Sample A sample selection profile that illustrates how to select a subset of the items and include all folders from the Packages and Task Sequences nodes in Deployment Workbench This selection profile includes all operating system packages and task sequences

NOTE If you have created any custom selection profiles, these will also be available for selection here.

Selection profiles are new in MDT 2010 and allow you to select one or more folders in Deployment Workbench that contain one or more items in Deployment Workbench, including applications, device drivers, operating systems, operating system packages, and task sequences. For more information concerning selection profiles, see the topic "Managing Selection Profiles" in the MDT 2010 documentation .

Include All Drivers From The Selected Driver group Select this option if you want to include all the device drivers in the selection profile you specified in the Selection Profile list box.

Include Only Drivers Of The Following Types Select this option to include only specific types of device drivers in the selection profile you specified in the Selection Profile list box. If you select this option, you can select one or more of the following:

■ Include All Network Drivers In The Selected group

Select this option to inject all the device drivers in the selection profile specified in the Selection profile list box.

■ Include All Mass Storage Drivers In The Selected group Select this option to inject all mass storage drivers found in the deployment share into the Windows PE boot images

■ Include All Video Drivers In The Selected group Select this option to inject all video drivers found in the deployment share into the Windows PE boot images .

■ Include All System-Class Drivers In The Selected group Select this option to inject all system drivers (such as motherboard drivers) in the deployment share into the Windows PE boot images .

After creating and configuring a deployment share in Deployment Workbench, you must update it to update the deployment share's configuration files and generate Windows PE boot images in the deployment share's \Boot folder. Deployment Workbench always generates .wim image files, which you can use to start destination computers using Windows Deployment Services . Choose to generate only the Windows PE bootable ISO images that are actually required. If you limit the number of images generated, the updating process is faster.

To update a deployment share, perform the following steps:

1. In the Deployment Workbench console tree, click Deployment Shares .

2. In the details pane, right-click the deployment share you want to configure and then click Update

3. On the Options page of the Update Deployment Share Wizard, shown on the following page, select one of the following options:

• Optimize The Boot Image Updating Process Select this option to update existing versions of the image files in the deployment share. Choosing this option reduces the amount of time required to update the boot images . If you select this option, you can also select Compress The Boot Image Contents To Recover Space Used By Removed Or Modified Content if desired. Selecting this suboption reduces the size of the boot images but may increase the time needed to generate the images

• Completely Regenerate The Boot Images Select this option to create a new version of all the image files in the deployment share . You can choose this option when you want to force the creation of new images . Note that this can take some time to complete .

4. Finish the wizard. Depending on how your deployment share is configured and the options you selected in the Update Deployment Share Wizard, generating Windows PE boot images may take some time to complete.

After the deployment share has been updated, Windows PE boot images and other files will be present in the \Boot folder of the deployment share (see Figure 6-6).

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figure 6-6 \Boot folder of updated deployment share showing Windows PE boot images that were generated figure 6-6 \Boot folder of updated deployment share showing Windows PE boot images that were generated

IMPORTANT You must update your deployment share if you make changes to any the settings on the properties sheet of your deployment share. The Windows PE boot images will not contain your updated settings until you update your deployment share.

Capturing a Disk Image for LTI

In MDT 2010, installing a build and capturing an image is essentially an LTI deployment that ends with the Windows Deployment Wizard capturing an image of the destination computer When you create a deployment share, Deployment Workbench provides the option of prompting to capture an image (the Ask If An Image Should Be Captured check box). You must enable this option, as described in the section titled "Creating and Configuring a Deployment Share" earlier in this chapter.

Then, when you install the build on the destination lab computer, the Windows Deployment Wizard asks whether you want to capture an image after installation is complete. The wizard also allows you to specify a destination for the image . The default destination is the \Captures folder in the deployment share, and the default file name is task sequence .wim, where task sequence is the ID of the task sequence you installed.

To capture an image, start a lab computer using the Windows PE boot image generated by updating the deployment share . Start the Windows PE boot image in either of two ways . One way is to burn the .iso images to a DVD. This process is slow and tedious . These ISO image files reside in the \Boot folder of the deployment share. The other way is to add the LiteTouchPE_x86 .wim or LiteTouchPE_x64 .wim image files to the Boot Images item of a Windows Deployment Services server. The .wim image files are in the \Boot folder of the deployment share . For more information about installing and configuring Windows Deployment Services, see Chapter 10 .

To capture an image using the Windows Deployment Wizard, perform the following steps:

1. Start the lab computer using the Windows PE boot image that you created in the section titled "Updating the Deployment Share" earlier in this chapter. You can start this boot image by burning the .iso file to CD or DVD media or by adding the .wim file to Windows Deployment Services . For more information about Windows Deployment Services, see Chapter 10.

2. In the Welcome Windows Deployment dialog box, click Run The Deployment Wizard To Install A New Operating System.

3. In the User Credentials dialog box, type the credentials necessary to connect to the deployment share (user name, domain, and password) and then click OK . The Windows Deployment Wizard starts automatically. To capture an image using the Windows Deployment Wizard, you must use an account that has Read and Write access to the deployment share, such as an account that is a member of the local Administrators group on the computer that contains the deployment share .

4. On the Select A Task Sequence To Execute On This Computer page, choose a task sequence to run from the list of available task sequences and then click Next.

5. On the Configure The Computer Name page, type a computer name or accept the default and then click Next . The default, randomly generated computer name is reasonable because the computer name will change during deployment to the production environment

6. On the Join The Computer To A Domain Or Workgroup page, click Join A Workgroup . In the Workgroup box, type a workgroup name or accept the default and then click Next . If you join the computer to a domain, the Windows Deployment Wizard does not prompt you to capture an image .

7. On the Specify Whether To Restore User Data page, select Do Not Restore User Data And Settings and then click Next.

8. On the Packages page (if displayed), choose the packages, such as software updates and language packs, that you want to install on the image and then click Next.

9. On the Locale Selection page, choose your locale and keyboard layout and then click Next . Your choice here is irrelevant, because the Windows Deployment Wizard will configure the locale and keyboard layouts during deployment to the production environment

10. On the Select The Time Zone page, select a time zone and then click Next. Your choice here is irrelevant, because the Windows Deployment Wizard will configure the time zone during deployment to the production environment .

11. On the Select One Or More Applications To Install page (if displayed), select the check box next to each application that you want to install on the image and then click Next .

12. In the Specify Whether To Capture An Image page, select Capture An Image Of This Reference Computer. In the Location box, type the Universal Naming Convention (UNC) path of the folder in which to store the image or accept the default capture location. In the File Name box, type the file name of the image or accept the default file name for the captured image. The default UNC path is the \Captures folder of the deployment share; the default image file name is the ID of the task sequence being installed Click Next

12. Click Next, then on the Ready To Begin page, click Begin.

After you click Begin, the Task Sequencer begins running the build's task sequence . By default, it begins by partitioning and formatting the hard disk. Then it installs and configures the operating system, runs Sysprep to prepare the computer for imaging, and restarts the computer in Windows PE to capture the image. The Windows Deployment Wizard stores the captured image in the folder specified on the Specify Whether To Capture An Image page, which is the deployment share's \Captures folder by default. After capturing the image, you can add it to the deployment share as a custom image by using the steps described in the section titled "Creating and Configuring a Deployment Share" earlier in this chapter. For more information about deploying your custom Windows 7 image, see Chapter 12.

Preparing Images Manually

The deployment share tells Windows Setup how to install and configure Windows 7 on the destination computers . It includes the settings (answer file) as well as device drivers and packages that you want to add to the operating system. It might also contain applications that you want to install.

A common way to deliver operating systems to users is to create an image of the desired configuration. This is particularly true when the deployment share includes other files, such as applications . Creating an image that you install on each destination computer is quicker and more efficient than installing the uncustomized Windows 7 image and then installing applications on each destination computer.

Sysprep prepares a Windows 7 installation for imaging or delivery to end users. Sysprep removes all user-specific information from a system and resets any system-specific security identifiers (SIDs) to allow the system to be duplicated. Once duplicated, systems using the duplicated image will register their own SIDs with the domain in which they are deployed. Sysprep has several command-line options to control its behavior, listed in Table 6-8.

table 6-8 Sysprep Command-Line Options

OPTION DESCRIPTION

/audit Restarts the computer into audit mode In audit mode, you can add additional drivers or applications to Windows Vista You can also test an installation of Windows Vista before it is sent to an end user. If you specify an unattended Windows Vista setup file, the audit mode of Windows Setup runs the auditSystem and auditUser configuration passes .

/generalize Prepares the Windows installation to be imaged. If you specify this option, all unique system information is removed from the Windows installation. The system's SID is reset, any System Restore points are cleared, and event logs are deleted. The next time the computer starts, the specialize configuration pass runs . A new SID is created, and the clock for Windows activation resets (if the clock has not already been reset three times).

/oobe Restarts the computer into Windows Welcome mode . Windows

Welcome allows end users to customize the Windows operating system, create user accounts, name the computer, and complete other tasks . Any settings in the oobeSystem configuration pass in an answer file are processed immediately before Windows Welcome starts

/reboot Restarts the computer. Use this option to audit the computer and to verify that the first-run experience operates correctly.

/shutdown Shuts down the computer after Sysprep completes.

OPTION

DESCRIPTION

/quiet

Runs Sysprep without displaying on-screen confirmation

messages. Use this option if you automate Sysprep .

/quit

Closes Sysprep after running the specified commands .

/unattend: answerfile

Applies settings in an answer file to Windows during unattended

installation . You can create this answer file in Windows SIM.

answerfile

Specifies the path and file name of the answer file to use .

When you create a Windows 7 installation that you plan to image, you then use Sysprep to generalize the system. The following command generalizes the system and prepares it to run the Windows Welcome Wizard on the next restart.

sysprep /oobe /generalize

Most organizations use this command If you are a system builder or an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), however, you can also use Sysprep to create build-to-order systems The following command lets you place a system into audit mode on the next restart, wherein you can install additional applications and modify configurations sysprep /audit /generalize /reboot

The following command then completes the customization by preparing the system to run the Windows Welcome on the next boot, which is a typical requirement in a retail environment sysprep /oobe

When all system preparations have been made, the system is ready for imaging You can use the ImageX command with the /FLAGS parameter to capture an image of the system. You can then burn the image onto a DVD, import it into a deployment share, or leave it on the system for use on the next system start

Customizing Microsoft Deployment Toolkit

You can brand some features in MDT 2010. You can customize Deployment Workbench and the Windows Deployment Wizard. For example, you can customize Workbench.xml in C:\Program Files\Microsoft Deployment\Bin to change the text displayed in the Deployment Workbench title bar and for each item in the console tree . Although it's generally safe to customize the <Name> tag in Workbench .xml, you should avoid changing other tags .

The LTI process is driven by .xml files called definition files. You can brand the entire LTI process by customizing the following files, which are found in the \Scripts folder in your deployment share:

■ BDD_Welcome_ENU.xml Customize this file to change the text displayed on the Windows Deployment Wizard's Welcome page .

■ Credentials_ENU.xml Customize this file to change the text displayed in the User Credentials dialog box

■ DeployWiz_Definition_ENU.xml Customize this file to change the text for each page displayed by the Windows Deployment Wizard.

■ Summary_Definition_ENU.xml Customize this file to change the text in the Deployment Summary dialog box, which displays at the end of the LTI process.

Summary

The new installation architecture first introduced in Windows Vista and deployment tools included in the Windows AIK make deploying Windows 7 in your organization easier than deploying earlier versions of Windows The new wim file format makes it possible to deploy highly compressed image files Windows 7 helps reduce image count by removing hardware and other dependencies from the image. Modularization in Windows 7 makes servicing images easier than with legacy methods, so you no longer have to apply, customize, and recapture an image to update it. The new answer file format, Unattend.xml, provides a more flexible and consistent configuration. Finally, deployment tools in the Windows AIK 2. 0 provide a robust way to create, customize, and manage Windows 7 images.

Although the Windows AIK 2. 0 provides the basic tools for customizing and deploying Windows 7, MDT 2010 provides a more flexible framework for deploying Windows 7 in businesses . MDT 2010 enables you to create and customize multiple image builds . The framework includes automation common to most businesses and is highly extensible to suit any requirements . For example, by using MDT 2010 to deploy Windows 7, you can include custom actions such as installing applications, packages, and drivers that are performed during installation .

Additional Resources

These resources contain additional information and tools related to this chapter.

■ Chapter 3, "Deployment Platform," includes information about the Windows 7 installation architecture, its key features and technologies, and how the various features interact

■ Chapter 4, "Planning Deployment," includes information about installing and preparing MDT 2010 for use . This chapter also describes how to use the MDT 2010 documentation.

■ Chapter 10, "Configuring Windows Deployment Services," explains how to install and configure Windows Deployment Services and how to add images to and deploy images from Windows Deployment Services.

■ Chapter 11, "Using Volume Activation," includes more information about Windows 7 product keys and volume activation .

■ Chapter 12, "Deploying with Microsoft Deployment Toolkit," includes more information about using MDT 2010 to deploy Windows 7 images in the production environment .

■ Microsoft Deployment Toolkit Reference in MDT 2010 lists the properties you can configure in a deployment share .

■ Windows Automated Installation Kit User's Guide for Windows 7 contains detailed information about the tools and technologies included in the Windows AIK 2 .0. This guide is in the file Waik. chm in the Windows AIK 2. 0.

CHAPTER 7

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  • filibert took-brandybuck
    Why it is necessary to create a Deployment Share when working with imaging?
    8 years ago
  • katja
    How does windows deployment workbench determine which profile to use?
    8 years ago
  • evelynn
    How to add NIC Driver to Boot Image in MDT 2010?
    8 years ago
  • mikolaj
    Where is Deployment Share Folder?
    8 years ago
  • mary royal
    What does update deployment share?
    3 days ago

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