Editing Permissions for Specific People

The fourth choice, Specific People, lets you set permissions for yourself, for the homegroup, for Everyone, and for individual user accounts, using the permissions list shown in the File Sharing dialog box, shown in Figure 20.10.

Homegroup Permissions

Figure 20.10

You can control the type of access to a shared library, folder, or file that is granted to your homegroup, and in some cases to specific user accounts.

Figure 20.10

You can control the type of access to a shared library, folder, or file that is granted to your homegroup, and in some cases to specific user accounts.

Any entries that you add for individual users won't apply when other users in your homegroup try to use the shared resource, because member computers always use a common built-in account. Entries for individual users only affect access from computers that aren't members of the home-group, and from computers not running Windows 7. And whether a specific account will be used or the Guest account will be used depends on that complex list of situations I provided under "File Permissions and Networking" earlier in this chapter.

If you have computers on your network that run older versions of Windows, and thus can't be members of the homegroup, you can give their users easy access to your shared files in either of two ways:

• You can turn off Password Protected Sharing on your computer. Then, add Everyone to the permission list. The other computers will get access to the files this way.

• If you want to leave Password Protected Sharing turned on on your computer, either create accounts for each of the other computers' users on your computer, using their account names and passwords, or create a single user account named, for example, "sharing" on your computer, assign a password to it, and have all of the other users use this account when they connect over the network. Add this account to the permissions list, and grant it Read or Read/Write access.

Sharing Resources

To change the permissions granted to a user or group listed in the File Sharing dialog box, shown in Figure 20.10, change the entry in the Permission Level column to Read, Read/Write, or Remove, which removes the entry from the list. To add a new entry, select a name from the drop-down list next to the Add button, then click the Add button. You can then change the new entry's Permission Level.

Your account is listed as the file's or folder's owner, and you can't change this entry.

^ To see how to set up a homegroup for your Windows 7 computers, see "Setting Up a Homegroup,"p. 478.

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  • louie
    Can i define file permissions in windows 7 homegroup?
    8 years ago

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